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Engineering diversity and inclusion

Challenging companies to deliver equality on all fronts

8 - 9 November 2018 | InterContinental London – The O2

CPD 14 hours
 

Workshops

 
Day one - 13:30
Workshop options: Choose one from workshop A, B, C or D

A

The Inclusion Confusion, not on my watch: Creating diversity at the board level

Summary

If we want to solve a business problem we must first understand the root causes before we deploy a range of appropriate solutions, which sounds like simple business logic; right? So why then do we not apply the same logic and tools to solving the problem of Inclusion and Diversity within industry?

In this session Ed Jervis gives us his unique take on why we are so far from where we need to be. Coming from an Operational Excellence and Transformational Change background; Ed poses some key questions and is purposely disruptive, in challenging the way we think giving us some practical take-away solutions.

Ed believes that change will not come about by making people feel defensive or to blame for these issues; however he is clear that we all have a responsibility to resolve them. Ed believes that not only is this the right thing to do; but for organisations who get this right the commercial upside is enormous.

Key areas covered

  • Evolution and the role of our instincts
  • Unconscious bias and institutionalised behaviours
  • The ‘Lived Experience’ of your people, be careful of privilege
  • Inclusion, the business case
  • Creating a culture of marginal gains

Key learning points

  • Introspective, questions leaders should ask themselves
  • Practical take-away activities and suggestions
  • A clear model for building a diversity and inclusion strategy at Board Level

Workshop facilitator:

Ed Jervis, Operational Excellence Black Belt, Global Head LGBT Network, Serco

 

B

Effectively engaging with schools to build a diverse talent pipeline

Summary

To create a diverse and inclusive engineering sector we need to attract more young people from a wide range of backgrounds into STEM careers.

This workshop explores how employers can play an important role in growing the engineering talent pipeline and ways to work effectively with schools to inspire more young people. As collaboration between employers and schools is key to this success, Tideway will provide practical insights from their perspective.

Key areas covered in this workshop

  • Why employer engagement is so important to attract a diverse range of engineering talent
  • Explore why some young people are not choosing STEM subjects and careers
  • Research and best practice around engineering outreach
  • Tideway’s approach to working with schools and growing the talent pipeline
  • Further employer case studies

Main learning points from this workshop

  • Understand the current STEM engagement landscape
  • How employers can develop their CSR and talent generation programmes to align with D &I priorities
  • Sharing best practice and insights into how other employers are working with schools

Workshop facilitator:

Aimee Welch, London Employer Support Manager, EngineeringUK

 

C

Recognising mental health issues at work and developing solutions to tackle the challenges

Summary

Engineering is a high-hazard industry, and we have a huge focus on the physical safety of our profession considering risk, with preventative and mitigation barriers put in place to ensure everyone will return home safe from work. Mental health and wellbeing need the same rigour of approach.

Suicide is the biggest killer of men under 50, and in the construction sector if you are male you are 3.7 times more likely to take your own life compared to the national average. Join this interactive workshop to explore how proactivity on mental health could help pave the way for a more diverse and inclusive engineering work force.

Key areas covered in this workshop

  • Introduction to physical safety and similarities in culture between positive safety culture and inclusive culture
  • Introduction to mental health issues
  • Case studies from role models being open about their mental health issues
  • Methods for creating an inclusive culture around mental health
  • Opportunity to engage and feed-in on an industry-wide approach

Main learning points from this workshop

  • Understand mental health issues and how people can be supported
  • Explore an alternative way of framing and articulating the benefits inclusivity in your business to drive engagement from the majority workforce
  • Be empowered to make change in your organisation to raise awareness of positive mental health and wellbeing

Workshop facilitator:

Dr Mark McBride-Wright, Managing Director, EqualEngineers

 

D

Assessing the legal responsibilities of employers in compliance with the Equality Act

Summary

The Equality Act which came into force on 1 October 2010, replaced almost all of the previous equality legislation and aimed to harmonise the previous provisions, make the law easier to understand and strengthen protections in certain areas.

Having an understanding of and complying with the basics of the Equality Act is a crucial starting point to any organisation wanting to achieve diversity and inclusion.

This participative workshop will cover the key provisions of the Act focusing on areas which employers often make mistakes such as making reasonable adjustments for employees with disabilities; areas which are less well understood such as indirect discrimination and the parts of the Act which are most helpful to driving diversity and inclusion.

Key areas covered in this workshop

  • The protected characteristics and why there aren’t just nine
  • The different types of discriminatory behaviour contained within the Act
  • How to justify certain types of potential discrimination
  • The definition of a legally defined disability and what criteria should be taken into account when assessing whether an adjustment is reasonable
  • How positive action can be utilised to drive diversity and inclusion

Main Learning Points from this workshop

  • An understanding of the key provisions of the Equality Act
  • Applying the definitions of the Equality Act to real life examples
  • How to utilise the Equality Act to drive diversity and inclusion

Workshop facilitator:

Nicky Siddall-Collier, Employment Law Specialist and D&I Champion, ISS Facility Services

 
Day one - 15:30
Workshop options: Choose one from workshop E, F, G or H

E

Tackling gender diversity – A 4 step methodology to enable change

Summary

Global economic growth could be threatened if the rising gap between demand for and supply of engineers is not addressed. Engineering historically has a poor record of achieving gender parity in its workforce.

This skills shortage could be fulfilled by women, who remain one of the most underutilised business resources. Given the business case for making changes that would increase economic growth and productivity, the workshop will look at a practical framework for companies willing to gain benefit from a gender-balanced workforce.

Key areas covered in this workshop

  • Business case for gender parity
  • Gender Indicators; Quotas and KPIs
  • How to develop a bespoke methodology for action
  • Example of a 4 methodology to enable change
  • How to address resistance to change

Main Learning Points From This Workshop

  • Ability to set gender indicators within an organisation
  • Ability to develop a bespoke action plan to tackle gender diversity in the workplace
  • Ability to address resistance to change within organisations

Workshop facilitator:

Cristina Savian, Managing Director, BE-WISE

 

F

How to develop inclusive job adverts that attract diverse candidates

Summary

An overview of the business case for inclusive hiring and the principles behind the creation of inclusive job adverts in the context of an inclusive hiring process.

Key areas covered in this workshop

  • Business case for inclusive hiring
  • What inclusive hiring looks like
  • How unconscious bias affects our language
  • Job Adverts Analysis
  • How to get it right: inclusive job adverts

Main Learning Points From This Workshop

  • Ability to identify key business advantages to inclusive hiring
  • Ability to recognise ways in which unconscious bias plays a part in hiring
  • Ability to identify subjective criteria in job ads and how to address it

Workshop facilitators:

Maria Grazia Zedda, Equality, Diversity and Inclusion Workforce Manager, HS2

 

G

What actually works in D&I? Using insights and behavioural science to drive action

Summary

There is an increasing body of evidence that some of our tried and trusted D&I techniques are not working. Harvard Business Review has evaluated the millions spent on unconscious bias training and found very little impact.

As we all move to an era where our work on D&I has to be more mature, the team at Transport for London are using the best of recent developments in behavioural science to drive forward our work so that it has a real impact as well as a tight focus on using a solid evidence base and bespoke actions.

Key areas covered in this workshop

  • How do we know what works in D&I
  • Increasing disclosure
  • Measuring progress
  • Lessons learnt
  • Bespoke solutions

Main Learning Points From This Workshop

  • We need to be more scientific in measuring what works in D&I
  • Sometimes we need bespoke solutions depending on different cultures and challenges
  • Its ok to fail – we just need to learn

Workshop facilitator:

Frances McAndrew, Diversity and Inclusion Lead, Transport for London

 

H

Data driven culture change: how to use data to effect culture change

Summary

The Academy research “Creating cultures where all engineers thrive” showed that one of the seven indicators of inclusion is leadership but how do we measure that leadership is being effective?

At this workshop we will explore how leadership can be measured by looking at the D&I Measurement in Engineering booklet that was launched in September 2018. We will also look at the Progression Framework that the Academy developed in conjunction with the Science Council for Professional Engineering Institutions and Science Council members to enable them to measure their progress on D&I.We will then look at how this information can be used to effect culture change.

Key areas covered in this workshop

  • D&I - what can be measured?
  • How can we measure D&I?
  • What will a maturity matrix on D&I tell us?
  • How can data, measures and a maturity matrix effect culture change

Main learning points from this workshop

  • What can be measured
  • How can it be measured
  • What can you do with the information

Workshop facilitators:

Gill Thomas, Senior Manager, Diversity & Inclusion, Royal Academy of Engineering

 
Day two - 13:30
Workshop options: Choose one from workshop I, J, K or L

I

Inclusivity in academia – is it different from elsewhere and how do we overcome any barriers?

Summary

In this workshop, we will explore some of the factors that may (or may not) differentiate the environments that prevail in academia in comparison with corporate environments. Academia includes staffs as employees, and students who are increasingly being viewed as “customers”. Academic establishments also have a very significant influence on suppliers, contractors, local and wider communities.

Staff and students are very diverse but are the experiences that they have reflecting that diversity? Since the role of teaching institutions is to develop future generations as employees, employers and citizens, is academia leading diversity and inclusion agendas and how should it do so?

Key areas covered in this workshop

  • Are the issues of inclusivity different in academia from any other workplace or environment?
  • Why would academia be different?
  • Does academia have good practices to share, or lessons to learn?
  • What about the further education sector?
  • How academic research could support changes in the corporate world

Main learning points from this workshop

  • What academia can learn from companies
  • What companies can learn from academia
  • Topics for academic research and the teaching curriculum

Workshop facilitators:

Professor Alison Hodge MBE, Emeritus Professor of Engineering, Aston University

 

J

How to use role models correctly to help diversify engineering - the good, the bad and the unachievable?

Summary

Role models have been used for years to promote STEM subjects to the next generation. But do they work? Is it possible that some do more harm than good, and what makes a good role model anyway? In this practical workshop we will share some nuggets of our extensive experience in STEM outreach and summarise the key research that can help your organisation deliver a more inclusive role model project.

For anyone who co-ordinates STEM ambassadors or role model campaigns, this workshop will help keep you up to date with the latest thinking, and maybe challenge some of your own assumptions.

Key areas covered in this workshop

  • An introduction to role models as a tool to inspire diversity in engineering
  • An overview of what the research can tell us about the influencers of young people
  • An opportunity to analyse some previous role model projects and pull out good and bad practice
  • Sharing insights from young people about what attracts them to role models and careers
  • How ‘girlification’ could negatively impact on diversity

Main learning points from this workshop

  • Understand how role models can be used in the most effective way for diversity
  • An overview of what relevant research and evaluation has been done
  • How to increase the impact of using role models in various ways

Workshop facilitators:

Wendy Sadler MBE, Director, Science Made Simple
Deborah Syrop, Design Engineer / Research Student, Cardiff University

 

K

Realising the benefits of an ageing workforce: Tackling ageism and the generational gap in the workplace

Summary

In the UK, people are living longer, the baby boomers are heading towards retirement, and the birth-rate has declined year on year since 2012. Half of all adults in the UK will be over 50 years old by 2030. UK engineering businesses are already experiencing talent and skills gaps, and with fewer young people set to enter the workforce than those retiring each year, it is crucial that businesses can retain and recruit more older workers.

This highly interactive workshop offers an introduction to age at work and explores the key challenges facing both businesses and older workers. Participants will hear about practical solutions that leading employers and Human Resources Directors are adopting, as they respond to an ageing and multigenerational workforce.

Key areas covered in this workshop

  • The effect of demographic change on the economy, businesses and society
  • Key reasons why the employment rate drops significantly at age 50
  • Age-related myth busting
  • What businesses need to do to retain, retrain and recruit more over 50s
  • Practical solutions and impact stories from leading employers

Main learning points from this workshop

  • An understanding of demographic change and the impact on engineering businesses and workforce
  • The most effective solutions for supporting an ageing and multigenerational workforce
  • How to embed age-inclusion into your existing diversity & inclusion / human resources work

Workshop facilitators:

Anne Willmot, Age at Work Director, Business in the Community
Carly Binger, Age and Wellbeing Adviser, Business in the Community

 

L

An engineering approach to gender diversity

Summary

A team of engineers and researchers at Airbus have taken a different approach to tackling the gender diversity problem within their R&T community.

Following an extensive literature review, they’ve created a System Dynamics model that can be used to simulate different actions and assess what impact they have.

Key areas covered

  • Importance of gender diversity in innovation/research
  • Reasons for taking an engineering approach
  • How to construct an engineering model for a social problem
  • How to use such a model
  • Recommendations / Lessons learned

Key learning points

  • Research findings on importance of gender diversity in innovation
  • Combining data analytics and system dynamics in an engineering model
  • Interpreting data and convincing stakeholders

Workshop facilitator:

Rhys Phillips, Research Engineer, Airbus

 
Day two - 15:30
Workshop options: Choose one from workshop M, N, O or P

M

Setting D&I metrics – how do you measure success?

Summary

Diversity, Equality & Inclusion (EDI) should be on every company’s agenda, not only because research shows a more diverse business is a more profitable business, but also because the people we employ are our biggest assets. Creating an inclusive environment is not only the right thing to do, it is key to ensuring people can unleash their full potential. However finding a place to start, or keeping up with momentum can be difficult.

This interactive session will guide you through various EDI initiatives, how to measure the impact and successes of running them.

Key areas covered in this workshop

  • What are the pro’s and cons of setting targets
  • The role of senior management when implementing EDI initiatives
  • Top tips on bringing EDI to life
  • How to keep the conversation going

Main learning points from this workshop

  • Where to focus your attending on EDI
  • Practical tips on embedding EDI
  • A commitment to making change

Workshop facilitators:

Kris Phelps, Member Engagement Manager, Employers Network for Equality & Inclusion

 

N

Empowering employees to set up Employee Resource Groups and deliver associated strategies for D&I

Summary

An Employee Resource Group (ERG) typically consists of individuals with similar demographic characteristics or life experiences who work together for a common goal and support diversity and inclusion within the organisation. Members do not necessarily have to possess the defining characteristics of the ERG, but can simply be supportive (an ally) of those that do. ERGs can be critical in driving diversity and inclusion strategies across an organisation.

They support a richer, more inclusive workplace culture; providing support, enhancing career development, and contributing to personal development in the work environment. ERGs allow the voices of employees to be heard and encourage the power of diverse thinking as well as promote networking opportunities and exposure to leaders at various levels of the organisation.

At this workshop, you will learn that recognising people's differences is a way to celebrate diversity and ERGs allow the opportunity for others to learn from those differences. During this workshop, Rolls-Royce lessons learnt and strategies will be shared to highlight issues that are relevant to all employees and assist your organization in recognising and changing behaviours in the work place to deliver diversity and inclusion.

Key areas covered in this workshop

  • How can employees lead change in D&I
  • What are some of the blockers for ERGs
  • How to overcome those blockers – responsibilities of senior management, the ERG and the general population
  • Success stories and the different ERGs present in RR as a global company

Main learning points from this workshop

  • The importance of ERGs as a powerful tool to encourage staff to lead change
  • Creating a high performing culture - key experiences in Rolls-Royce and success stories
  • Rolls-Royce lessons learnt and strategies for improving D&I through ERGs

Workshop facilitators:

Yolanda Carrillo, Comms and Members Lead of UK Gender Diversity Network / Graduate Engineer, Rolls-Royce
Evangelia Velentza, Career Development Lead of UK Gender Diversity Network / Safety and Reliability Engineer, Rolls-Royce
Rachel Wheatley, Networking Lead of UK Gender Diversity Network / Capability Acquisition Manager, Rolls-Royce

 

O

Breaking stereotypes and improving the image of engineering

Summary

In this interactive workshop we start by exploring the perceived stereotypes and image of engineering. Personal stories will be used to help illustrate what attracts individuals into the profession.

The discussion will explore ‘barriers to entry’ from the knowledge and experience of the attendees. There are many positive examples of initiatives endeavouring to attract and retain a wide range of talent into the industry.

Highlights will be used to help with the second discussion looking at what the future should and could look like; what we can do as individuals, as organisations and industry wide, using and sharing best practice from our collective experiences.

Key areas covered in this workshop

  • Personal stories to highlight good practice
  • Explore stereotypes and the image of engineering
  • An overview of current industry initiatives
  • A future gazing discussion and sharing best practice
  • Explore a personal commitment to change

Main learning points from this workshop

  • Explore the perceived image of engineering
  • Learn from colleagues and share best practice
  • What we can do collectively to enable change

Workshop facilitator:

Alex Lawrence, Divisional Director, Ramboll

 

P

Recognising privilege and the role of the privileged in improving D&I

Summary

Privilege comes in a myriad of forms, both in society and in the workplace. In this workshop we will explore what these forms are and guide the attendees in a self-assessment

We will explore how privilege may present itself in the workplace and how that impacts on diversity and inclusion. We will look at tools and initiatives that can help to neutralise the impact.

Key areas covered in this workshop

  • Discussion on the different types of privilege
  • Personal activity to identify what your privileges might be
  • Group work in tables based on scenarios in the workplace
  • Feedback from the group work
  • Tools/initiatives that can help to neutralise privilege in the workplace

Main learning points from this workshop

  • Knowing the different types of privilege that exist
  • How privilege might present itself in the workplace
  • Tools/initiatives that can help to neutralise privilege in the workplace

Workshop facilitator:

Samantha Daly, Inclusion and Diversity Lead, Jacobs

 

Programme is correct at time of publication. Topics and speakers are subject to change.

Pricing

£249